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40 Days Working in Costa Rica

Learn How Faith Spent Her Time in Costa Rica

Have you heard about XploreAsia’s new program? We’re giving people the chance to live and teach in Costa Rica, as well as earning an internationally accredited TESOL certification and offering a cultural orientation week to get you ready to experience this welcoming culture.

In this blog read all about how Teacher Faith spent her time in Costa Rica, and how this experience left her with such a positive outlook on this country and its culture. 

Hi Faith! Can you tell me a little bit about yourself and why you chose to travel to Costa Rica?

Well, I spent eighteen months living in Canada where I learned some Spanish. After, I really wanted to experience a Spanish-speaking culture and found an opportunity to teach in Costa Rica and live with a host family. I grew up on a farm so that led me to spend a lot of time helping out on my host family’s cattle ranch. I loved it so much, I hope to go back next year!

 

What Was Your Favorite Thing About the Culture in Costa Rica?

I was surprised at how nice people are. In Costa Rica, 80% of tourists are from America and the tourism industry is vital to their economy. However, in a lot of countries with a big tourist industry, people are just respectful, whereas Costa Ricans were genuinely very warm, welcoming and friendly towards me. I’ve never had a bad experience with any of the locals I met in Costa Rica.

My favorite thing was seeing the love they have for themselves and their culture. They’re very proud to be ‘Ticos’ and it was wonderful to them talking with such pride about their culture.

Faith

What was a typical day like for you in Costa Rica?

I was there volunteering so I spent a lot of time doing that. In the morning, the sun rises very early, but people usually don’t get up until later. I’m very used to waking up early with the sun, so I would usually wake up around 5am and use the time to study. At 7 a.m.  or 8 a.m., we would eat breakfast, before I would set off to teach my classes for the day. When I wasn’t teaching, I really enjoyed hiking in the hills; it’s a really good way to workout! I also did a lot of touristy stuff like going to the beaches.

In San Pedro, I also really enjoyed horseback riding. It can be a little expensive in the touristy and coastal areas, but it’s still good to do the touristy things whilst you’re there. In the smaller towns, it’s very cheap to drink and eat with friends and I’d recommend making an effort to get to know lots of local people. They can help you find hidden gems, and many of them are very eager to show tourists around their country. 

It’s very easy to find something to do here. With every step, it feels like you’re stepping into a new adventure. From the local excursions to the activities meant for tourists to enjoy, you’ll never be bored! 

How was your experience teaching in Costa Rica?

I was doing private tutoring with adults, although I also worked with some kids. The demand to learn English is high as it can help people get better jobs due to the large tourist industry. When I go back to Costa Rica, I’m going to tutor the same students again as I made an amazing bond with them. I can’t wait to hear how they have improved with their English.

Is it easy to find different kinds of food there?

In San Jose, the capital, it’s very easy to find international restaurants. The locals were curious about food from other cultures and my host family often asked me to cook American dishes for them to try. It might be harder to find international food outside the capital, such as my host family’s town, San Pedro, but groceries are very cheap so it’s easy to find ingredients if you want to make some dishes you’re used to making at home. It’s also easy to find options for people with dietary restrictions.

One of the most interesting dishes I tried was pargo fish. The locals eat the eyes of the fish, which was a new experience for me. The flavour was really good, but the texture was very weird!

One of the many delicacies, Pargo Fish, you can try while in Costa Rica
Try delicious food while working in Costa Rica
Delicious local Costa Rican food

What advice would you give to people coming to Costa Rica from abroad?

Don’t bring tight clothes. Joggers and loose, breathable clothing will be best suited to the humidity. I was there during the rainy season, which is from June to December. It’s still sunny and humid, but there is a lot of rain. Invest in a nice umbrella if you want to stay dry! The temperature never drops too low. One time, it was around 70 degrees and raining, and the host mother made hot chocolate, so the locals will think it’s cold sometimes.

If you learn some Spanish, it becomes easier to barter when buying goods and exchanging money. As said before, making friends with the locals will also help you get the most out of your time here, and Spanish knowledge will also help you to connect with them.

 Work in Costa Rica and collect your own memories on this experience. Get in touch to start your next adventure now! Make sure to visit our Instagram and Facebook pages to see pictures, videos and updates from our teachers.

 

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